Women's rights and abolitionism

In the course of American History, no reform movements have been as significant or historically important, as were women's rights and abolitionism. Many of the same people argued for both of the reform movements before the civil war. Correspondents were constantly sent back and forth between the leaders of both movements. Many issues discussed by both parties usually delved around the same argument. While both parties had different goals in mind, you can see through the speeches and letters written by the leaders, that on many occasions, they would use the same points to strengthetn their arguments while at the same time coming to a different request.
Considering the time period in which these movements occurred, one of the strongest arguments that were made by both sides, was related to religion and the bible. As a women's rights activist put it, "Thou further sayest, that it was designed that the mode of faining influence and exercising power should be altogether different and peculiar. Does the Bible teach this… Did Jesus… give a different rule of action to men and woman?" This use of religion to argue women's rights on numerous occasions was used also to argue against slavery, usually with different contexts. As Frederick Douglass so put it, "in the name of the constitution and the Bible, which are disregarded and trampled upon… that serves to perpetuate slavery-the great sin and shame of America!" As you can see leaders from both parties would in some how question their movements goals in relation to religion, god and the Bible.
Another viable example both groups would use to strengthen their argument included the government and legislature. While different, both groups would some how, either use the constitution and it's wording, to benefit or argue that there were being used by the government, without the reward that others receive. The leaders of the women's would those a…