Women in the Civil War

Many women played many different and important parts in the Civil War. Some famous women from the Civil War include Rose Greenhow, a spy, Clara Barton, a nurse, and Harriet Tubman. Some women helped with the war effort from their homes, while others went to the battlefields to make themselves useful.
Women's contributions are probably more widely thought of on the battlefield. Most helped with aiding wounded soldiers.Some nurses, like Clara Barton, went out onto the fields, risking their lives, during battle to comfort dying soldiers and take care of wounded ones. Other women, such as Sarah Edmonds, passed themselves off as men to act as soldiers during battle. It is estimated that hundreds of women pretended to be men to join the army. Many were wounded or even killed.
A few women acted as spies, the most famous of them was Rose "Wild Rose" Greenhow, who worked for the Confederate Army. One woman who acted for the Union was Dr. Mary E. Walker, who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for her work as a spy, soldier, and surgeon. Still, even some other women acted as maids and cooks for different brigades while at camp. These women tried to encourage troops at times of battle.
The women on the battlefields were the only ones who took care of men who were wounded or dying. Without them, the casualties might have been even more drastic and those who did die felt a little better having a nurse there with them. Also, the soldiers, while very few of them, were important because they weren't supposed to be in battle but came anyway.Women spies of course, had great effects, because they would be less suspected than a man during times of war. Rose Greenhow had an enormous effect on the Battle of Bull Run.
Women who stayed at home also contributed to the Civil War. Women had to take over the jobs that were usually held by men. Wartime volunteers became abundant. They organized the U.S. Sanitary Comm…