Huck descriptions such as, “It would get so

Published by admin on

Huck is very responsive to the beauty of the natural world about him. He uses vivid imagery to describe nature in a peculiar way, which one can even consider out of character for him. His word choice, general attitude, use of literary devices, and the use of words which describe the sounds as they happened, all add to his vivid description of the summer storm. Huck’s reaction is unusual because up to this point in the story the impression of Huck that the reader has is one of a wild, uneducated boy running away from home. The reader does not expect Huck to analyze nature by using thought provoking similes
Huck’s use of action words contribute greatly to the descriptiveness of his account of the summer storm. These words add to the thrust and movement of his description. “Directly it begun to rain…rained like all fury…never see the wind blow so” (43). “…and the rain would thrash along by so thick….blast of wind..” (43+44). These descriptions keep the description moving and keeps the interest of the reader. They invoke common experiences that everyone has experienced. After reading these action words, the reader begins to develop a image of what it was like to be Huck at that point. This image is further aided by other factors.

The other factors that influence the image the reader perceives are: word use, literary devices, allusions to common experiences, and specific details. Some of the specific details include use of color and descriptions of the environment. Vivid descriptions such as,
“It would get so dark that it looked all blue-black outside, and lovely; and the rain would thrash along by so thick that the trees off a little ways looked dim and spider-webby; and here would come a blast of wind that would bend the trees down and turn up the pale underside of the leaves; and then a perfect ripper of a gust would follow along and set the branches to tossing their arms as if they was just wild; and next, when it was just about the bluest and blackest — fst! It was as bright as glory, and you’d have a little glimpse of treetops a-plunging about away off yonder in the storm, hundreds of yards further than you could see before; dark as sin again in a second, and now you’d hear the thunder let go with an awful crash, and then go rumbling, grumbling, tumbling, down the sky towards the under side of the world, like rolling empty barrels down-stairs — where it’s long stairs and they bounce a good deal, you know” (44).
That one sentence encompasses all of the techniques and provides an excellent description. It uses personification, alliteration, allusions, personification, and others.

Huck uses several onomatopoeias in his description of the storm. In addition to painting a picture in the readers mind, because of his use of onomatopoeias, the reader can also experience and hear the scene and the storm as if he/she were actually there. Huck uses four words to describe how thunder sounded. The first is fst, “…when it was just about the bluest and blackest – fst! It was as bright as glory…” (44). The other three are: rumbling, grumbling, and tumbling. “…and now you’d hear the thunder let go with an awful crash, and then go rumbling, grumbling, tumbling, down the sky towards the under side of the world…” (44).

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

Huck then uses one simile in paricular to further exemplify the sound of the thunder and to create a better scene for the reader. “…tumbling, down the sky towards the under side of the world, like rolling empty barrels down-stairs — where it’s long stairs and they bounce a good deal, you know” (44). This simile enhances this description of the storm in a few ways. The last part, “…you know” (44) adds more character to the description. It is beginning to sound more like a child, Huck. Also, anyone can imagine what rolling barrels down a long set of stairs sound like and when the reader really thinks about it, he/she realizes that, that is what thunder sounds like.

Huck’s vivid description of thunder, both visually and audibly, add to his personality and allows the reader to experience a different side of Huck. Huck is not just a naive child who is oblivious to natural wonders. He is responsive to the beauty of the natural world about him. There is more to him then meets the eye. Huck shows the reader this by his choice of words and the way in which he describes the summer storm. His uses literary devices to his advantage and to further his points. Huck shows he is not a shallow character and can be serious if he wants to.

Categories: Environment

E.M. slavery, than betray his friend by

Published by admin on

E.M. Forster makes a bold statement when he declares that he would rather betray his country than betray his friend. Forster takes a very moral stand on the issue and states that a friendship is often more important than a government’s actions or society’s beliefs. His opinion regarding the value of friendship is a common theme shared by many authors throughout history, including Mark Twain, and Alexandre Dumas.


Mark Twain’s classic novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, describes a young boy torn between what he feels his country and society expect of him and what his heart tells him is right. Society believes that slaves should be treated as property; Huck, who had befriended a runaway slave, sees Jim as a person, not property. In the end, Huck Finn decides that he would rather disobey society’s teachings about slavery, than betray his friend by returning him to his previous condition of servitude.


Further reiterating Forster’s conception of the proper order of one’s loyalty is a product of English folklore, Robin Hood. According to legend, Robin Hood robbed from the rich and gave to the poor in an effort to bring happiness to the peasants of Nottingham in an otherwise dreary time under the tyrannical rule of Prince John. A childhood friend of Robin, Maid Marion places her friendship with Robin Hood above loyalty to the crown. She has numerous opportunities to betray Robin Hood, but she does not. She sees the good he is doing for the land and the lone resistance he and his band of Merry Men provide against the evil Sheriff. Had she been loyal to her country, Robin Hood would have never been successful against the Sheriff of Nottingham and the citizens of her kingdom would have had to endure even greater injustices.
Sharing many of the same principles Robin Hood embodies is Alexandre Dumas’s The Three Musketeers. The famous trio of noblemen battle against the villainy of the Court of King Louis XIII. D’Artagnan, Athos, Porthos and Aramis fight to preserve the honor of their Queen, Anne of Austria, against the Cardinal Richelieu. Their famous motto ” All for one and one for all!” illustrates the value they place on their friendship. Efforts to maintain their close ties of friendship help them in resisting an immoral government. Had they chosen to remain in adherence to the Cardinal’s oppressive rule, they would have been unsuccessful in effecting change.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now


The value of friendship has been a prevalent theme throughout both literature and history. Authors representing several eras have addressed the moral dilemma of friendship versus loyalty to one’s country. Governmental leaders and their policies are transient; friendships last a lifetime.

Categories: Government

x

Hi!
I'm Iren!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out